Property Information INR00718

Post to: GB Dairies Partnership C/- R Borst 1971 Egmont Road, RD 6 Inglewood - 4386 borhen@primowireless.co.nz Farm Dairy Assessment for Supply Number - 43015 Modified Sanitation Inspection Melissa Poingdestre Fonterra approved Farm Dairy Assessor Phone : 021 714 128 Email : melissa@qconz.co.nz Dear Raymond & Maryse, Thank you for your time today to carry out your Farm Dairy Assessment. The purpose of the assessment is to ensure that your farm meets the food safety and quality standards set by the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI). The following is a report of your farm dairy assessment completed on the 17/12/2020. Presentation Area Comment Score Tanker track in good order 1 Farm entrance/tanker road/tanker loop Collection area tidy 1 Milk collection area and dairy surrounds 2 All equpiment stored tidy Storage of equipment 1 Exterior in good order and yards Farm dairy exterior and yard Overall 5 Excellent No No N/A No Assessor Commendations Quality Management Follow-up required Revisit Date Classification A A N/A B Section Premise Hygiene Premise Structures Plant & Equipment Hygiene Environment N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Plant & Equipment Structures No N/A A Dairy dairy filled out to a high standard n Thank you very much for your time today. Excellent presentation of dairy and book work. Have a great christmas Assessor Comment Client present Water status Water clarity Milk filtering % of requirement Last e-coli water test date Water checklist risk Hot water % of requirement e-coli test result Water improvement plan in place Yes 19/09/2019 Absent Compliant Farm Details 119.22% 108.33% No 100cm N/A Farm Dairy Improvements : NA Farm Dairy and Environmental Assessment Supplier Number: 43015 Page 1 of 3 Assessor : Melissa Poingdestre - Phone : 021 714 128 Assessment date : 17/12/2020 Report must not be reproduced unless in full

Key Minor Major Critical Major Revisit ü Hazard Removed Recommended Action Assessor Comment Faults Rating Food Safety Report QM (Quality Management) DD procedures Security of Milk Milk Harvesting Pre-teat Spray ADF Milking Machine Test Milker Health Animal Treatements and storage No Sections Ratings 01 02 04 05 06 07 08 Commendation Compliant Compliant N/A N/A Compliant Compliant Compliant Sick and Diseased 09 Cleaning Programme 10 Pest Control 11 Agrichemical use 12 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 No Sections Ratings Animal Health Records Diseased Cows Veterinary Dockets Monthly Hygiene Records Dairy Water Temporary Water Exclusion Water Treatement Systems E-coli Sampling E-coli Failure Brought in Feed Waste/Agrichemical Use Milk Cooling Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant N/A N/A N/A N/A Compliant N/A Compliant Disposal of Milk 03 25 Compliant Dairy Diary Procedures Commendation Dairy dairy filled out to a high standard Hygiene Premise and Cleanliness Surrounds Tanker Roadways Farm Dairy Exterior Agrichemicals Animal Treatments Detergents Dairy Storage No Sections Ratings 26 27 28 29 30 31 Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Ratings Sections No 37 36 35 34 33 32 Veterinary Waste Amenities(Other rooms) PC Milk Room/Vat Stand Yards/Races/effluent Feed Storage / Calf milk Additional Hazards Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant PC Milking Area 38 39 Compliant Supplier Number: 43015 Page 2 of 3 Farm Dairy and Environmental Assessment Assessment date : 17/12/2020 Assessor : Melissa Poingdestre - Phone : 021 714 128 Report must not be reproduced unless in full

Premise Structure and Facilities Tanker Roadways Farm Dairy Exterior Minimum Distances Agrichemicals Dairy Storage Amenities-Other rooms No Sections Ratings 50 40 41 42 43 Compliant Minor Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant 49 48 47 46 45 44 No Calf Milk Feed Storage Yards/Races/Effluent Milking Area Milk Room/Vat Stand Sections Compliant Major to minor Major Compliant Compliant Ratings Milking Area Major to minor Wall in ceiling patched during visit. MINOR pitted in pitt area and bail area all well managed Any holes in dairy walls/ceilings Yards/races/effluent (Feed Pads), (Housing) Major Larger cracks in main yard area that will need fixing during dry off period Large cracks or holes Farm Dairy Exterior Minor Roof starting to rust no holes just keep an eye on Plant and Equipment Structure Facilities No Sections Ratings 67 68 61 62 63 Compliant Milk Line, Milk Receiver Compliant Milk Filter Milk Cooler and Delivery Line Compliant Compliant 66 65 64 No Sections Ratings Utensils Air System Cleaning System Milk Cooling Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Environmental Ratings 1. Any sustainability alert ? No Has the milking plant been opened during the visit? No Notes The milk plant has not been inspected. Supplier Number: 43015 Page 3 of 3 Farm Dairy and Environmental Assessment Assessment date : 17/12/2020 Assessor : Melissa Poingdestre - Phone : 021 714 128 Report must not be reproduced unless in full

Confidential to Fonterra Co-operative Group Page 1 On Farm Assets Sales and Compliance Assessment Assessment Completed on 28-09-2021 Assessment Completed by Kevin Hart Supplier 43015 About the Sales and Compliance Assessment The Sales and Compliance Assessment is a pre-sale assessment of the farm’s entrance, tanker roadway and loop, vat stand area, and any on farm bridges, cattlestops, culverts and underpasses. The assessment is carried out against the standards set out within the Farmers’ Terms of Supply which have been developed to ensure our tankers enter the farm, access the farm’s milk collection point, and leave the farm in the most safe and efficient manner. The purpose of this assessment is to notify potential purchasers of the farm’s standing against the Farmers’ Terms of Supply and highlight any remedial actions that need to be taken to meet the standards within the Farmers’ Terms of Supply. The Assessment Process The Sales and Compliance Assessment has been carried out at the request of the Seller or their Agent for the purpose of providing to potential purchasers. The Assessment has been carried out in person by an On Farm Assets Representative and all information captured is correct at the time of assessment. During the assessment a visual inspection will be carried out on any on farm bridges, cattlestops, culverts, and underpasses within the tanker roadway. Our team undertake a visual inspection to identify any issues that require further investigation by a trained professional. This visual inspection should not be viewed as any form of engineering compliance assessment and all certification and regulatory standards should be met as per the Farmers’ Terms of Supply. Through this assessment there may be corrective actions identified that need to be implemented to bring your farm in-line with the Fonterra standards. These will be highlighted within the Assessment Results and may be graded as;

Fonterra Co-operative Group Confidential to Fonterra Co-operative Group Page 2 • Critical = issue must be remedied before supplying • Major = issue must be remedied between 0-2 years, as agreed with the Regional Asset Specialist • Minor = issue must be remedied between 0-5 years, as agreed with the Regional Asset Specialist Should you wish to discuss any of the reports findings the Area Manager, Business Development Manager, or Regional On Farm Asset Specialist will be happy to assist. If you have any questions or queries please contact 0800 65 65 68.

Fonterra Co-operative Group Confidential to Fonterra Co-operative Group Page 3 Entrance Way Assessment Entrance Way Measurement Entrance Way Assessment Assessment Result Speed Limit of Road 100kmh Operating Speed of Road 100kmh Distance of clear visibilty - Left 250m Meets Fonterra Spec Distance of clear visibilty - Right 250m Meets Fonterra Spec Type of Road – Sealed or Unsealed Sealed Is there a gate within 24m of the road boundary? No Meets Fonterra Spec Distance from farm boundary to center of road 7.5m Major Width of farm entrance (A) 9m Splay of farm entrance (B) 7.5m Notes Entrance Way – Picture of Entrance Way Entrance Way – Picture of left when leaving Entrance Way – Picture of right when leaving

Fonterra Co-operative Group Confidential to Fonterra Co-operative Group Page 4 Tanker Roadway Assessment Tanker Roadway Measurement Tanker Roadway Assessment Assessment Result Tanker roadway width (min 4.5m between fences) 4.5m Meets Fonterra Spec Driveable metal surface width (min 3.5m) 3.5m Meets Fonterra Spec Is the roadway gradient acceptable? Yes Meets Fonterra Spec Does the roadway have the correct width at the bends? N/A Meets Fonterra Spec Is there trees protruding over the tanker road? N/A Meets Fonterra Spec Is the roadway fenced and stockproof? Yes Meets Fonterra Spec Does the roadway have a stock crossing? No Meets Fonterra Spec Is the crossing within 45m of Dairy concrete? N/A Is the roadway surface condition up to company specification? Yes Meets Fonterra Spec Is the roadway the center of the Irrigation Anchor Point? N/A Are there any irrigators over the tanker road? No Diameter of the tanker loop 30m Meets Fonterra Spec Width of usable roadway on tanker loop 7.5m Meets Fonterra Spec Amount of clearance within tanker loop (min 3m) 3m Meets Fonterra Spec Notes Tanker Roadway - Tanker Loop Image 1 Tanker Roadway - Tanker Loop Image 2

Fonterra Co-operative Group Confidential to Fonterra Co-operative Group Page 5 Vat Stand Assessment Vat Stand Measurement Vat Stand Assessment Assessment Result Does the farm have a tanker pad? Yes Meets Fonterra Spec Tanker pad length (8m) 15m Meets Fonterra Spec Tanker pad width (5m) 5m Meets Fonterra Spec Access to silo pad Good Meets Fonterra Spec Are all vat and CIP switches safely accessible and clearly identified? Yes Meets Fonterra Spec Where are the switches located? Left Switch control box to open sideways or downwards? Downwards 3 way valve and CIP plumbed correctly? Yes Meets Fonterra Spec Vat stand height? 600mm Vat Outlet Valve from front of vat stand? 270mm Separate wash pumps per vat? Yes Meets Fonterra Spec Does the heat recovery have frost protection? No N/A Does the heat recovery have dump valve? N/A N/A Door type N/A Door operation N/A N/A Structural integrity of stand Good Meets Fonterra Spec Are the steps safe to use? Good Meets Fonterra Spec Notes Vat Stand – Picture of Vat Stand Vat Stand – Picture of Steps Vat Stand – Photo of Vat Stand Structural Issue (if any)

Fonterra Co-operative Group Confidential to Fonterra Co-operative Group Page 6

Fonterra Co-operative Group Confidential to Fonterra Co-operative Group Page 7 Terms of Supply Diagrams – Entrance and Tanker Loop

Fonterra Co-operative Group Confidential to Fonterra Co-operative Group Page 8

Fonterra Co-operative Group Confidential to Fonterra Co-operative Group Page 9 Terms of Supply Diagrams – Entrance and Tanker Loop – Transitional Standard

Fonterra Co-operative Group Confidential to Fonterra Co-operative Group Page 10

Fonterra Co-operative Group Confidential to Fonterra Co-operative Group Page 11 Milk Collection Plans and Specifications – Tanker Roadway Gradient

Fonterra Co-operative Group Limited Shares and Payments Private Bag 92032, Auckland 1142, New Zealand 109 Fanshawe Street, Auckland t 0800 65 65 68, f +64 9 374 9451 www.fonterra.com 4 June 2021 Measurement Statement 2021/2022 Season Your Holding at 4 June 2021 Your Measures for the 2021/2022 Season Ivan Lloyd Gopperth; Raymond Anthony Borst; Robert England Your shareholding is within the range allowed for the 2021/2022 season. In any event, Share Standard compliance obligations for the 2021/2022 season are now temporarily on hold for all supplying farmers holding a minimum of 1,000 shares and exiting farmers that are selling shares over three seasons in accordance with the Constitution – until a date to be advised. Number Held Co-operative Shares 65,844 Vouchers that can count towards meeting the Share Standard1 7,708 Total Holding (Co-operative Shares plus Counting Vouchers) 73,552 Supply Number Minimum Holding Maximum Holding (further details are provided on the following page) 43015 70,636 141,272 2021/2022 Season Measures Minimum Holding (minimum number of Co-operative Shares)2 70,636 Maximum Holding (maximum number of Co-operative Shares) 141,272 1For Share Standard compliance, a maximum 25% of the Minimum Holding can be satisfied by Vouchers. 2The Fonterra Share Standard is one Co-operative Share or Counting Voucher for each kilogram of milksolids obtainable from the Average Quantity of Milk supplied (excluding Milk supplied on Contract Supply). The Average Quantity of Milk is the average quantity of milksolids supplied in the immediately preceding three seasons or, in certain circumstances, an estimate of the quantity of milk expected to be supplied. Page 1 COPY GB Dairies Partnership C/- R Borst 1971 Egmont Road RD 6 Inglewood 4386 Party Number: 14606 Supply Number: 43015 CSN: 310055417

Supply Measures for the 2021/2022 Season The supply measures have been calculated from the following production: Season Type kgMS kgMS 2018/2019 Actual production 70,181 2019/2020 Actual production 72,415 2020/2021 Actual production 69,314 Three Season Average 211,910 ÷ 3 = 70,636 2021/2022 Season Measures Minimum Holding 70,636 Maximum Holding 141,272 Measures for Supply 43015 GB Dairies Partnership Fonterra Co-operative Group Page 2 COPY Party Number: 14606 Supply Number: 43015 CSN: 310055417 4 June 2021

FARM INS IGHTS REPORT 1 Farm Insights Report 2020/2021 Supply Number: Environment Milk Animals 43015

FARM INS IGHTS REPORT 2 This report uses the information that you provide in your Farm Dairy Records, together with milk quality and production data that the Co-op holds, to provide useful insights into what is happening on your dairy farm. The metrics included in this report highlight risks and opportunities that may exist in your farming system, helping you to improve your efficiency and reduce your impact. The Co-operative Difference Achievements Introduction For more information on The Co-operative Difference please go to www.fonterra.com/makethedifference Previous seasons data will be shown where data is available and farm ownership hasn’t changed. 2018/2019 2019/2020 2020/2021 Dairy farm effective area Peak cows (maximum cow numbers) Stocking rate (milking cows) Production (milk solids produced) Production per cow Production per hectare Nitrogen fertiliser applied per hectare Imported supplementary feed fed Imported supplementary feed fed per cow Average somatic cell count Greenhouse Gas Emissions per hectare Your Farm’s Key Information The Co-operative Difference is the framework to ensure that on-farm practices support the achievement of our strategy. The Co-operative Difference metrics show how your farm tracked if the achievements had been in place for the 2020/2021 season to give you an indication of achievement. Milk Quality Excellence If Te Pūtake is achieved, to reach Te Puku you need a minimum of 30 days of Milk Quality Excellence to receive 3c per kgMS on all ‘Excellence’ milk To achieve Te Tihi you must achieve an excellence rating on at least 90% of the days that you supplied milk Purchased Nitrogen Surplus 2020/2021 season: Purchased Nitrogen Surplus is at or lower than 137 kgN/ha (75th percentile for Fonterra farms nationally) Farm Grown Feed 2020/2021 season: Your herd’s diet needs to be made up of at least 80% farm grown feed 2020/2021 season: 2020/2021 season: 83 kgN/ha 95% 259 days 92% 86.0 ha 86.0 ha 86.0 ha 161 cows 170 cows 166 cows 1.9 cows/ha 2.0 cows/ha 1.9 cows/ha 70,181 kgMS 72,415 kgMS 70,378 kgMS 436 kgMS/cow 426 kgMS/cow 424 kgMS/cow 816 kgMS/ha 842 kgMS/ha 818 kgMS/ha 101 kgN/ha 89 kgN/ha 119 kgN/ha 247 t 187 t 64 t 1.5 t/cow 1.1 t/cow 0.4 t/cow 84,776 cells/ml 97,013 cells/ml 79,847 cells/ml - 8,222 kgCO2e/ha 7,805 kgCO2e/ha

FARM INS IGHTS REPORT 3 Your farm’s environmental insights are broken down into Purchased Nitrogen Surplus, Nitrogen Risk Scorecard and Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Environment Your Farm’s Purchased Nitrogen Surplus Purchased Nitrogen Surplus is the difference between the nitrogen inputs (fertiliser and imported feeds) and the nitrogen outputs (milk, meat, crop or supplementary feeds). A high number means more nitrogen is at risk of being lost from your farm to the receiving environment. Purchased Nitrogen Surplus Nitrogen Fertiliser Imported Feed Exported Product = Irrigation Stock Management Imported Feed Effluent Management Nitrogen Fertiliser Cropping & Cultivation Your Farm’s Nitrogen Risk Scorecard Your Farm’s Purchased Nitrogen Surplus Per Hectare Your benchmark's average 50% of your benchmark group are within this range Your farm kgN/ha 119 kgN/ha 20 kgN/ha 56 kgN/ha 83 kgN/ha 2018/2019 2019/2020 2020/2021 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Your farm is benchmarked against other farms in the Taranaki region with production up to 850 kgMS/ha. 124 kgN/ha 90 kgN/ha 83 kgN/ha

Stock Management Nitrogen Fertiliser Imported Feed Nitrogen Fertiliser Applications The more nitrogen fertiliser applied, the higher the nitrogen loss risk Nitrogen Imported From Feed The greater the amount of imported feed, the more nitrogen that enters the system Total Milking herd Replacement/other animals Nitrogen Use Efficiency of Fertiliser The greater the conversion efficiency, the lower the nitrogen surplus available to be lost Timing of Application Fertiliser applied during the winter months can increase the chance of nitrogen being lost Stocking Rate The higher the stocking rate (peak), the greater the nitrogen loss Highest Application Rate Lower application rates reduce the nitrogen loss risk Feed Budget Using a feed budget or wedge to help plan strategic fertiliser applications is a good farming practice Nitrogen Content The greater the average nitrogen content, the higher the amount of nitrogen that enters the system Nitrogen Use Efficiency of Imported Supplements The greater the conversion efficiency, the lower the nitrogen surplus available to be lost Total Grown on this farm Pasture & crops Imported to this farm Pasture & crops * All other feeds Dry Matter Eaten The more dry matter eaten per hectare, the more nitrogen ingested by the animal and returned to pasture as dung and urine Wintering Off/Culling Reducing the number of animals on farm (from peak numbers) by culling and/or wintering off (May-Aug) will reduce the nitrogen loss risk on your dairy farm effective area Off pasture facility On pasture Break fed fodder crop Winter Practices Reducing the amount of time cows spend on pasture and/or crops over winter will reduce the nitrogen loss risk 4 Your Farm’s Nitrogen Risks Broken Down Energy model calculations based upon the DairyBase model developed by DairyNZ. * Includes feed fed to stock grazed off the dairy farm effective area Key driver of Nitrogen loss risk FARM INS IGHTS REPORT Total 19.9 su/ha (1.9 cows/ha) 15.4 su/ha 4.5 su/ha Total 12.0 tDM/ha 11.4 tDM/ha 0.0 tDM/ha 0.6 tDM/ha 2% off platform 0% On pasture 100% 0% 119 kgN/ha 7 kgMS/kgN Sep - Apr Jul - Aug May - Jun Below 25 kgN/ha Above 25 kgN/ha No feed budget used Feed budget used 20 kgN/ha Average N content of 2.72% 40 kgMS/kgN

Your Farm’s Nitrogen Risks Broken Down Continued... Cropping & Cultivation Season of Harvest/Grazing Crops harvested/grazed during winter pose a higher risk to nitrogen leaching Conventional This is the greatest risk method for sowing a crop and the risk increases as the cultivated area increases Minimum Tillage This is a lower risk activity than conventional cultivation, however the risk increases with the total area cultivated Direct Drill This is a lower risk activity than both full cultivation and minimum tillage for establishing a crop FARM INS IGHTS REPORT Irrigation Irrigation Application Method Having control over the amount and how often water is applied can greatly influence nitrogen loss risk with poor management of irrigation events leading to induced drainage Irrigation Scheduling Deciding when to start or stop irrigation is important as poor management of an irrigation event can lead to induced drainage Effluent Management Effluent Irrigation Area An undersized effluent area can result in the average amount of nitrogen per hectare applied exceeding local rules and regulations Application Depth Low rates will ensure greater flexibility of management with more irrigation days available and increase the chance of the plant utilising the nutrients within the effluent rather than it being lost Effluent Discharge Method Discharging treated effluent to land is the lowest risk Irrigate to pasture Irrigate to pasture (low storage) Discharge to water Discharge to water and pasture 5 Key driver of Nitrogen loss risk Irrigation Method Irrigation generally increases the nitrogen loss risk due to the potential for over irrigating to induce drainage events. Some systems are inherently riskier than others irrespective of management Timing of Fertiliser Application There is greater risk if fertiliser is applied to crops during high risk months of May, June, July and August Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable 2ha/100 cows ischarge to water and pasture > 12mm application depth No fresh water irrigation Not Applicable Not Applicable

FARM INS IGHTS REPORT 6 Greenhouse Gas Emissions This section describes the greenhouse gas emissions on your farm. It has been designed to give you a better understanding of what is happening on your farm in relation to agricultural sources of biological greenhouse gas emissions. Your Farm’s Greenhouse Gas Emissions All emissions are given as a total amount of carbon dioxide equivalents (CO₂e). This is done to create a universal metric to compare greenhouse gases regardless of sectors and sources. This takes into account the different lifespans and warming potential of the different gas types. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Per Hectare This number indicates the biological greenhouse gas emissions per hectare from your farm which is made up of both methane and nitrous oxide gases Nitrous Oxide Total Nitrous Oxide emissions per hectare of your farm Methane Total Methane emissions per hectare of your farm Enteric Methane Methane is the single biggest contributor to on-farm emissions and is produced by microbes that are naturally present in the gut of ruminants (e.g. cows, sheep) and is emitted when they burp Nitrogen Fertiliser Nitrous oxide emissions from the applications of nitrogenous fertiliser Effluent System Nitrous oxide emissions from urine that is emitted while in storage and as it is spread to land via your farm’s effluent management system Urine & Dung Nitrous oxide emissions when dung and urine is deposited on to pasture Effluent System Methane emissions from dung that is emitted while in storage and as it is spread to land via your farm’s effluent management system Dung Methane emissions from dung that is deposited on to the pasture 7,805 kgCO2e/ha 6,036 kgCO2e/ha 1,769 kgCO2e/ha 5,542 kgCO2e/ha 414 kgCO2e/ha 271 kgCO2e/ha 19 kgCO2e/ha 223 kgCO2e/ha 1,336 kgCO2e/ha

Your Farm’s Greenhouse Gas Emissions Per Kg Milk Solids Your Farm’s Greenhouse Gas Emissions Per Hectare Your Greenhouse Gas Emissions were calculated using the Agriculture Inventory Model (AIM), which was developed by Ministry for Primary Industries. Farms in your benchmark group Your farm kg CO₂e/ha Your benchmark's average 50% of your benchmark group are within this range Your farm He Waka Eke Noa Partnership Primary Sector Climate Action Partnership Farmers, Government, and Māori working together to reduce Aotearoa New Zealand’s agricultural emissions while continuing to sustainably produce quality food and fibre products for domestic and international customers. This partnership aims to equip farmers with the knowledge, tools and support they need to reduce emissions and adapt to a changing climate. FARM INS IGHTS REPORT 7 7 For more information More information relating to agriculture and climate change is available on the He Waka Eka Noa and AgMatters websites. www.hewakaekenoa.nz www.agmatters.nz 2019/2020 2020/2021 5,000 6,000 7,000 8,000 9,000 10,000 8,222 kgCO2e/ha 7,805 kgCO2e/ha Your farm is benchmarked against other farms in Taranaki with production up to 850 kgMS/ha. 9.5 kgCO2e/kgMS Your farm is benchmarked against other farms in Taranaki with production up to 850 kgMS/ha. 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 2020/2021

FARM INS IGHTS REPORT 8 Milk This section of the report provides you with key insights into potential savings and opportunities for your farm. These insights have been calculated using existing tools and calculators that have been tested and developed through industry research. Your Farm’s Annual Average Somatic Cell Count 2020/2021 Mastitis is usually caused by bacteria, which enter through the teat canal and infect the udder. Eff ective mastitis prevention will ensure more milk in the vat, higher quality milk, less use of antibiotics and more time saved on farm. If your bulk somatic cell count (SCC) is greater than 100,000 cells/ml this indicates some cases of sub-clinical infection are present with the potential to impact milk production. Research has shown there is a 2.1% loss in production for every doubling of somatic cell count over 100,000 cells/ml. Somatic Cell Count Farms in your benchmark group Your farm Your Farm’s Historical Monthly Average Somatic Cell Count Your farm is benchmarked against other farms in your region. Farms in your benchmark group The Co-operative Diff erence Milk Quality Excellence target Your farm Previous season’s trends will be shown for up to three seasons where data is available and farm ownership hasn’t changed. Potential Risk $6,500 By increasing your cell count to 150,000 cells/ml there is the potential to reduce production on your farm and could cost up to $6,500. This does not include the cost of treatment or culling and is based off a milk price of $7.60. 79,847 cells/ml 40K 50K 60K 70K 80K 90K 100K 110K 120K 130K 140K 150K 160K 170K 180K 190K 200K 210K 220K 230K 240K 250K 260K 270K 280K 290K 300K 310K 320K 330K 340K 350K 360K 370K Your farm is benchmarked against other farms in your region. This placed you in the top 25% of suppliers in the Taranaki Region for the 2020/2021 season. JUN AUG OCT DEC FEB APR JUN AUG OCT DEC FEB APR JUN AUG OCT DEC FEB APR JUN AUG 0K 30K 60K 90K 120K 150K 180K 210K 240K 2018/2019 2019/2020 2020/2021

FARM INS IGHTS REPORT 9 Milking Efficiency More efficient milking leads to better outcomes for people, cows and farm profitability. Simple changes that save seconds per cow can quickly add up to minutes saved per milking, and hours saved per day. This section of the report uses milk vat monitoring data for your month of peak production to benchmark your milking efficiency. It uses DairyNZ research to provide an estimate of the amount of time that could be saved by changing the way your dairy is operated. Based On Your Information We Estimate You Could Save This estimate is based on your farm reaching 80-100% of its potential milking efficiency using the maximum milking time (MaxT) strategy. The insights provided in this section of the report will not be accurate if you are a split calving herd. For more detailed information please use the DairyNZ Milksmart App. Milking* Times Volume 1 2 3 Total *Milking is defined as the start of milk flow to the end of milk flow into the vat Your Farm’s Peak Milk Production Data Shed Type Herd Size Peak Month Peak Volume Milking Frequency Average Cows Milked Per Hour During Your Peak Month This benchmark is influenced by the number of clusters in the dairy and the herds level of production. Therefore, you are benchmarked against similar sized dairies nationally. 50% of your benchmark’s group are within this range Your farm Your benchmark average Average cows per hour Average Litres Per Cluster Per Hour DuringYour PeakMonth This benchmark allows a fair comparison of all dairy types, sizes and production levels. For context, if your cow’s average milk flow rate is 2 L/min, then the maximum potential would be 120 L per cluster per hour (2 L/min × 60 min/hour). All Fonterra farms Your farm Average litres per cluster per hour www.dairynz.co.nz/milking/ milking-efficiently/milksmart-app 9 to 12 hours per week 24 bail herringbone 162 cows October 3991 L/day TAD (10.3-13.7 h interval between milkings) 05:31 to 07:31 14 L/cow 15:51 to 17:18 11 L/cow - - 3 hours/day 25 L/cow 94 cows per hour 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 Herringbone 21-24 48 L/cluster/hr 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100

FARM INS IGHTS REPORT 10 Animals The heat generated by rumen fermentation means that cattle are more tolerant to cold conditions than humans, but it also makes them more likely to get too hot. Cows that are too hot will seek shade, drink more, and their appetite and rumination times will reduce, depressing production. Severe heat stress can also have impacts on reproductive performance. Previous New Zealand research (AgResearch and DairyNZ) has shown that milk production decreases relative to increasing temperature and humidity. Combining this research with actual and modeled weather data supplied by NIWA for your farm location, along with your herd size and breed, we have calculated the impact of unmitigated heat stress for your farm. There are lots of things you can do to reduce the impact of heat stress on your cows aside from planting trees or building a shelter. Changing milking routines so cows aren’t walking when it’s hot, checking and upgrading water troughs so they are large enough for the herd, and installing fresh water sprinklers at the shed are all relatively straight forward ways to keep your cows cool. Heat Stress Farm Details Herd size: Predominant breed: Predicted production loss due to heat stress: Days above threshold: Nearest virtual climate station: Estimates based on a collaborative NZ Bioeconomy in the Digital Age project between AgResearch, DairyNZ, NIWA and Fonterra funded by NZ taxpayers and Milksolids levy payers through the Strategic Science Investment Fund and DairyNZ Incl. In preparing NIWA VCSN data for this insight, all reasonable skill and care was exercised and the best available data and methods were used. NIWA accepts no liability for any loss or damage (whether direct or indirect) incurred by any person through the use of or reliance on this information Estimated Impact of Heat Stress For Your Farm Lost revenue range (predicted production loss @$7.60/kgMS) based on three most recent seasons of weather data from your nearest virtual climate station. To find out more in depth information about the impact heat stress can have on your herd visit DairyNZ website or scan the QR code. www.dairynz.co.nz/ animal/cow-health/ heat-stress 166 Friesian x Jersey 0 - 8 kgMS 0 - 3 days 2.51 kms $0 - $100 per year

FARM INS IGHTS REPORT 1 1 Lameness As well as being painful for aff ected animals, lameness can add considerable costs to a farming operation with impacts on milk production, reproduction and staff time required to treat and manage lame cows. The cost of a case of lameness varies depending on the stage of lactation and pregnancy, but DairyNZ suggests $250 per case as a conservative starting point. Even mild cases of lameness have a cost as cows will stand to graze less, reducing milk production and potentially causing loss of body condition. Most cases of lameness are mild and may not be identified if the cow is able to maintain her normal position when walking with the herd. Studies suggest the true prevalence of lameness may be three times higher than the number of animals treated. Taking time locomotion scoring the herd may allow you to identify lame cows early and improve their speed of recovery. Locomotion scoring is easy to do, but it requires someone to solely focus on watching the cows walking back to the paddock. For information on how to locomotion score cows visit the DairyNZ website. Body condition Thinner cows have less fat in their heel to distribute the impact of walking Nutrition Sub-clinical rumen acidosis can lead to inflammation within the foot and increased risk of lameness Management factors Hurrying cows on the race or keeping them on concrete for extended periods increases the risk of damage to their feet Weather Wet skin and hooves are softer and more susceptible to trauma and infection Previous lameness One of the biggest risk factors for a cow to be lame is if she has been lame before Genetics Claw conformation and hoof strength are both influenced by genes Infectious lameness Digital Dermatitis is the most common cause of infectious lameness in other countries, and is becoming more common in New Zealand Calving Cows’ connective tissues soften around the time of calving, increasing their risk of injury Factors Contributing To Lameness Estimated Cost of Lameness For Your Farm $3,000 The cost calculator utilises industry research to estimate the cost of lameness through lost milk production, cost of treatment, wastage through cull cows and discarded milk, and the impact on reproductive performance. The Lameness Cost Calculator is a valuable resource when trying to calculate the cost to your farm. Based on the conservative estimate of $250 per case and the 12 lame cows you reported in last season’s Farm Dairy Records the cost of lameness on your farm is at least $3,000.

FARM INS IGHTS REPORT 12 Mastitis is very painful for the affected animal. It takes time and money to treat and can have long term impacts on reproduction, somatic cell count and increases the risk of culling. Most of the antibiotics used in the dairy industry are for the treatment of mastitis, which is both a financial cost to farmers but also contributes to the risk of developing antibiotic resistant bacteria. Treatment costs and withheld milk are thought to cost farmers around $150 per case of clinical mastitis. DairyNZ have developed a gap calculator to help you better understand the costs of mastitis on your farm. Mastitis Your Farm’s Mastitis Cases Percentage of reported mastitis cases All Fonterra farms Your farm www.dairynz.co.nz/animal/ cow-health/lameness/ www.dairynz.co.nz/animal/ cow-health/mastitis/ To find out more about the impact lameness and mastitis can have on your herd, visit the DairyNZ website links below or scan the QR codes. Estimated Cost of Mastitis For Your Farm The information and insights provided to you in this report are sourced from information that you have provided through your Farm Dairy Records, together with milk quality and production data that we hold and third party industry research. While the information and insights provided may identify risks and opportunities, such information is general information only and is not in the nature of advice. We have done our best to align historical data to the new Milk Quality Framework. We make no representations or warranties (whether express or implied) as to whether information or data provided in this report is accurate, reliable or complete. You are solely responsible for your own assessment and evaluation of the information and for the actions or decisions you take in reliance on the information or data generated. Accordingly, Fonterra shall not be liable for any loss arising from any actions or decisions taken by you in reliance on the information contained in this report. $1,950 Mastitis can have a significant effect on your herd’s performance. Based on the numbers you provided Fonterra through the Farm Dairy Records the industry calculator has determined mastitis is roughly costing you $1,950. This figure does not include potential lost milk production due to infecton impacting yield. 8% 0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% 14% 16% 18% 20% 22% 24% 26% 28% 30% 32% 34% 36% 38% 40% 42%+

FARM INS IGHTS REPORT 13 Our Team Is Here To Help If you would like to discuss the details of this report please contact the Service Centre on 0800 65 65 68.

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